WICKED WHEEL2® For 7.3L Powerstroke 1994-2003 View larger

WICKED WHEEL2® For 7.3L Powerstroke 1994-2003


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Applications: 7.3L Powerstroke 1994-2003

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This wheel is a 1994 - 2003 Ford PSD 7.3L PSD Performance Billet Compressor Wheel for STOCK GTP38 and TP38 Turbo Applications - Wicked Wheel 2 (WW2) Compressor Wheel Series Part #WW38

Special Note: This turbo has a standard right hand thread - meaning you turn the compressor wheel to the left to loosen. No need to torque the Wicked Wheel on. Simply snug the Wicked Wheel until it fully seats. It will self-tighten to full torque. The Wicked Wheel is balanced at the factory. Turbo balancing after installation is not necessary.  
While capable of high boost numbers with supporting mods (like those shown in the graph below) these wheels are safe for stock turbo applications! We recommend that you continue using a wastegate in 1999-2003 models to avoid excessive boost. For maximum stock turbo life, do not exceed 32 lbs. of boost for extended periods of time.  :-)

Wicked Wheel® is a registered trademark of Bob Riley and DIESELSITE, INC.  All rights reserved. Any intent to mislead or confuse customers by using our name or mark is a violation of trademark infringement and will be enforced.

DO NOT USE AN IMPACT WRENCH TO CHANGE TURBO WHEELS! Impact wrenches cause stress fractures in the shaft that will cause failure either very soon or thousands of miles down the road. It's like a crack in your windshield that grows over time. Take your time and remove the turbo, hold onto the turbine shaft and remove the compressor wheel with an open end wrench.



Our goal with this project was to create a more efficient turbocharger. When we talk about a turbo's maximum recommended boost levels, we base that on the rpms the turbo needs to turn in order to create said boost. When you increase boost without increasing rpms or drive pressure, the load on the turbocharger is the same for the elevated boost as is was for the original lower boost number.  The best part is when you run at lower pressures, like you would in daily driving conditions, the drive pressure/ boost pressure ratios are always lower, which should in turn result in longer turbo life, not less. ~ Bob Riley